Thursday, 20 October 2016

pieceful ~ Golda ~ Farmer’s Wife 1930’s Sampler Quilt Sew-Along

Today is my turn as a guest blogger for the Farmer's Wife 1930's Sampler Quilt Sew-along with Fat Quarter Shop and Gnome Angel. I have made #38 Golda and I really love this block design!


I enjoy the simplicity of choosing just a few fabrics for each block. I pick my fabrics based on the theme of the letter so that always influences my choices and allows for some interesting combinations:


Two Liberty prints and Fan Dots in Brown, Mostly Manor by Victoria Findlay Wolfe.


For this block I decided to do English Paper Piecing and the piecing was fairly simple, following the block assembly instructions in the book.

The only tricky part is the points of the triangles, particularly on those longer, thin ones. I found it easier to fold over the top seams of the triangle first and then the bottom part - it really helped to prevent loosing those corner points:



There were quite a few little triangle pieces in this block but it does come together easily and I think it is a striking design.

#38 Golda
This letter follows the same theme as a few others in the book and focuses on the joys of farm living. I often decide to use brown in the blocks where farming is a focus. This particular print is gorgeous and I love how it has little bits of other colours in too. I used the pink Liberty pink to represent the fact that they "make a garden" and the green Liberty because "the grass never before was so green".



The pops of pink in each print really make me very happy! The back side is a little messy with all those dog ears but since it's a small block I'm just pressing them any which way and I'm not worried about it!



Have you made this block? 

If you want to join in the sew along, click the links below to purchase the book and join in the sew along - it's never too late!





GnomeAngel.com

2 comments:

  1. Good tip about the skinny triangles. And also I love the gold fan dots--so pretty.

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  2. the little pieces are so fiddly. Reading back through missed blog posts, and reading about the letters accompanying the blocks, this just shows where blogging is so much more substantial though less immediate than instagram

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